Laurance S. Rockefeller Visiting Faculty Fellows

  1. John Brunero

    Laurance S. Rockefeller Visiting Fellow

    Phone (609) 258-9666

    Fax (609) 258-1285

    Email jbrunero@princeton.edu

    Location Room 215, 5 Ivy Lane

    John Brunero is an associate professor of philosophy at the University of Missouri – St. Louis, and works mainly in ethics, especially on questions related to reasons and rationality.  Recent papers include “Reasons as Explanations” (forthcoming in Philosophical Studies), “Cognitivism about Practical Rationality” (provisionally forthcoming in Oxford Studies in Metaethics), and “The Scope of Rational Requirements” (Philosophical Quarterly, 2010).  While at Princeton, he’ll be working on a book on instrumental rationality.



  2. David Ciepley

    Laurance S. Rockefeller Visiting Fellow

    Phone (609) 258-9664

    Fax (609) 258-1285

    Email ciepley@princeton.edu

    Location Room 216, 5 Ivy Lane

    David Ciepley is an associate professor of political science at the University of Denver.  He is the author of Liberalism in the Shadow of Totalitarianism (2006), “Beyond Public and Private: Toward a Political Theory of the Corporation” (The American Political Science Review, 2013), and “Neither Persons nor Associations: Against Constitutional Rights for Corporations” (The Journal of Law and Courts, 2013).  He publishes in the fields of democratic theory, liberal theory, and corporate theory, and while at Princeton will be working on a book at the intersection of these fields that challenges the legal reclassification of corporations from “bodies politic” to private concerns.



  3. Paulina Ochoa Espejo

    Laurance S. Rockefeller Visiting Fellow

    Phone (609) 258-2736

    Fax (609) 258-2729

    Email aespejo@princeton.edu

    Location 303 Marx Hall

    Paulina Ochoa Espejo is an assistant professor of political science at Yale University. She works at the intersection of democratic theory and the history of political thought, especially on questions about democratic legitimacy, popular sovereignty and populism, immigration and the right to exclude, the territorial borders of the democratic state, and democracy in 19th century Latin America. She is the author of The Time of Popular Sovereignty: Process and the Democratic State (2011), “Paradoxes of Popular Sovereignty: A View from Spanish America” (Journal of Politics, 2012), and further peer-reviewed articles. During her time at UCHV, she will be completing a book manuscript, A Theory of Borders: People, Territory, and Legitimacy in the Democratic State.



  4. Chaim Gans

    Laurance S. Rockefeller Visiting Fellow

    Phone (609) 258-2660

    Fax (609) 258-2729

    Email cgans@princeton.edu

    Location 305 Marx Hall

    Chaim Gans is a professor of law at Tel Aviv University, where he teaches legal and political theory. He is also a senior researcher at the Shalom Hartman Institute in Jerusalem. His books include Philosophical Anarchism and Political Disobedience (1992), The Limits of Nationalism (2003), From Richard Wagner to the Palestinian Right of Return: Philosophical Analysis of Israeli Public Affairs (2006), and A Just Zionism: On the Morality of the Jewish State (2008). His book A Political Theory for the Jewish People: Three Zionist Narratives (2013) won several prizes. While at Princeton he plans to work on cosmopolitanism and cultural rights.



  5. Peter A. Graham

    Laurance S. Rockefeller Visiting Fellow

    Phone (609) 258-9721

    Fax (609) 258-1285

    Email pag2@princeton.edu

    Location Room 213, 5 Ivy Lane

    Peter A. Graham is an associate professor of philosophy at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. He works mainly in theoretical ethics and metaphysics. His publications include “The Standard Argument for Blame Incompatibilism” (Nous, 2008), “In Defense of Objectivism about Moral Obligation” (Ethics, 2010), “‘Ought’ and Ability” (Philosophical Review, 2011), and “A Sketch of a Theory of Moral Blameworthiness” (forthcoming in Philosophy and Phenomenological Research). While at Princeton he will be writing papers on the various ways facts about what we can do both constrain and influence what we are morally obliged to do.



  6. Waheed Hussain

    Laurance S. Rockefeller Visiting Fellow

    Phone (609) 258-2737

    Fax (609) 258-2729

    Email whussain@princeton.edu

    Location 307 Marx Hall

    Waheed Hussain is an assistant professor in the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania.  He works in moral and political philosophy, particularly on the relation between markets and broader individual and social ideals.  His publications include “Is Ethical Consumerism an Impermissible Form of Vigilantism?” (Philosophy and Public Affairs, 2012), “Corporations, Profit Maximization and the Personal Sphere” (Economics and Philosophy, 2012), and “The Unromantic Rousseauian: Scanlon on Justice, Freedom and Value Coherence” (Journal of Moral Philosophy, 2013).  While at Princeton, he plans to finish a book, Embracing the Invisible Hand: Market Governance and Human Freedom.



  7. Susan James

    Laurance S. Rockefeller Visiting Fellow

    Phone (609) 258-9700

    Fax (609) 258-1285

    Email sj10@princeton.edu

    Location Room 214, 5 Ivy Lane

    Susan James is a professor of philosophy at Birkbeck College, University of London. Her research focuses on some of the intersections between early modern philosophy, feminist philosophy, and contemporary political philosophy, and while she is at the Center for Human Values she will be working on a collection of essays about Spinoza’s politics, Spinoza on Learning to Live Together. Among her books are Passion and Action: The Emotions in Early Modern Philosophy (1997), Margaret Cavendish: Political Writings (2003), and Spinoza on Philosophy, Religion and Politics: The Theologico-Political Treatise (2012).



  8. Angela Smith

    Laurance S. Rockefeller Visiting Fellow

    Phone (609) 258-2738

    Fax (609) 258-2729

    Email angelams@princeton.edu

    Location 309 Marx Hall

    Angela Smith is a professor of philosophy at Washington and Lee University, where she has recently been named the first Roger Mudd Professor of Ethics and the first Director of the Roger Mudd Center for Ethics. Her research interests concern the connections between morality, moral agency, and moral responsibility. Recent papers include “Moral Blame and Moral Protest” (in Blame: Its Nature and Norms, 2013), “Attributability, Answerability, and Accountability: In Defense of a Unified Account” (Ethics, 2012), and “The Trouble with Tolerance” (in Reasons and Recognition: Essays on the Philosophy of T. M. Scanlon, 2011). While at Princeton, she will be writing a book on the importance of attitudes in moral life, tentatively entitled Attitude Matters: Responsibility, Respect, and Reconciliation.



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