Laurance S. Rockefeller Visiting Faculty Fellows

  1. Louis-Philippe Hodgson

    Laurance S. Rockefeller Visiting Fellow

    Phone (609) 258-9721

    Fax (609) 258-1285

    Email lhodgson@princeton.edu

    Location Room 213, 5 Ivy Lane

    Louis-Philippe Hodgson is an associate professor of philosophy at York University in Toronto. He works primarily in political and legal philosophy. Recent publications include “Why the Basic Structure?” (Canadian Journal of Philosophy, 2012); “Collective Action and Contract Rights” (Legal Theory, 2011); and “Kant on the Right to Freedom: A Defense” (Ethics, 2010). While at Princeton, he plans to work on institutionalist theories of justice, and in particular on the significance of actual and possible institutions for the theory of international justice.



  2. Hallie Liberto

    Laurance S. Rockefeller Visiting Fellow

    Phone (609) 258-2738

    Fax (609) 258-2729

    Email hliberto@princeton.edu

    Location 309 Marx Hall

    Hallie Liberto is an assistant professor of philosophy at the University of Connecticut and works in moral and social philosophy. Her work deals with moral rights, promises, and topics that arise in the ethics of markets, like exploitation theory. Recent publications include: “The Exploitation Solution to the Non-Identity Problem” (Philosophical Studies , 2014) and “The Moral Specification of Rights: A Restricted Account” (Law and Philosophy , 2014). While at Princeton, she will be working on a series of articles related to problematic promises.



  3. Alison McQueen

    Laurance S. Rockefeller Visiting Fellow

    Phone (609) 258-2736

    Fax (609) 258-2729

    Email aejm@princeton.edu

    Location 303 Marx Hall

    Alison McQueen is an assistant professor of political science at Stanford University. Her research focuses primarily on the intersection of religion and politics in early modern political thought, the history of international relations thought, and the use of digital methods in political theory. She is the author of Political Realism in Apocalyptic Times (manuscript), which explores how Niccolò Machiavelli, Thomas Hobbes, and Hans Morgenthau responded to hopes and fears about the end of the world. While at Princeton, she will be working on a book on Thomas Hobbes’ uses of the Hebrew Bible.

     



  4. Zoltan Miklosi

    Laurance S. Rockefeller Visiting Fellow

    Phone (609) 258-9666

    Fax (609) 258-1285

    Email zmiklosi@princeton.edu

    Location Room 215, 5 Ivy Lane

    Zoltan Miklosi is an assistant professor of political philosophy at the Central European University, Budapest. His work covers topics in distributive justice, the theory of political obligation, democratic theory, and the basis of equal moral status. His recent publications include: “A Puzzle about Free Speech, Legitimacy, and Countermajoritarian Constraints” (Res Publica, 2014) and “Against the Principle of All Affected Interests” (Social Theory and Practice, 2012). While at Princeton, he will be working on papers on the basis of political equality as it relates to political obligation, and on basic equality.

     



  5. David Plunkett

    Laurance S. Rockefeller Visiting Fellow

    Phone (609) 258-9700

    Fax (609) 258-1285

    Email djp4@princeton.edu

    Location Room 214, 5 Ivy Lane

    David Plunkett is an assistant professor in philosophy at Dartmouth College. His main areas of research are in Metaethics, Philosophy of Law, Ethics, and the Philosophy of Mind and Language. Recent publications include: “Legal Positivism and the Moral Aim Thesis” (Oxford Journal of Legal Studies, 2013) and “Disagreement and the Semantics of Normative and Evaluative Terms” (co-authored with Tim Sundell, Philosophers’ Imprint, 2013). While at Princeton, he will be working on questions about the nature of the dispute over legal positivism.

     



  6. Lucas Stanczyk

    Laurance S. Rockefeller Visiting Fellow

    Phone (609) 258-2737

    Fax (609) 258-2729

    Email stanczyk@princeton.edu

    Location 307 Marx Hall

    Lucas Stanczyk is assistant professor of political science at MIT and affiliated faculty in the philosophy department. He works primarily in political philosophy, with a focus on questions at the intersection of distributive justice and political economy. At Princeton, he will be finishing a book entitled: “From Each,” a theory of the standards that should be used to evaluate how modern liberal institutions lead adult citizens to reproduce the conditions of our common social life”. He will also continue working on a second book, which seeks to clarify central egalitarian standards of political morality and to examine how they figure in political philosophy on the one hand and contemporary social science on the other.



  7. Amy Dru Stanley

    Laurance S. Rockefeller Visiting Fellow

    Phone (609) 258-9664

    Fax (609) 258-1285

    Email adstanle@princeton.edu

    Location Room 216, 5 Ivy Lane

    Amy Dru Stanley is a history professor at the University of Chicago. Her research focuses on American history in the long nineteenth century – particularly on capitalism, slavery and abolition, human rights and liberalism, and the historical experience of moral problems. Methodologically, she works at the intersection of intellectual, legal, and social history. Her publications include: “Slave Breeding and Free Love: An Antebellum Argument over Slavery, Capitalism, and Personhood" (Capitalism Takes Command); “Instead of Waiting for the Thirteenth Amendment: The War Power, Slave Marriage, and Inviolate Human Rights” (American Historical Review); “Wages, Sin, and Slavery: Some Thoughts on Free Will and Commodity Relations” (Journal of the Early Republic); and “From Bondage to Contract: Wage Labor, Marriage and the Market in the Age of Slave Emancipation”. While at Princeton, she will be working on a book provisionally titled, “The Peculiar Path of Human Rights in America: From Slave Emancipation to the Commerce Power.”

     



  8. Sharon Street

    Laurance S. Rockefeller Visiting Fellow

    Phone (609) 258-5914

    Fax (609) 258-2729

    Email sstreet@princeton.edu

    Location 215 1879 Hall

    Sharon Street is an associate professor of philosophy at New York University. Her work focuses on whether it is possible to understand ethical objectivity in a way that coheres with a scientific conception of the world. Her articles include: “A Darwinian Dilemma for Realist Theories of Value” (Philosophical Studies, 2006), “Constructivism about Reasons” (Oxford Studies in Metaethics, 2008), and “Evolution and the Normativity of Epistemic Reasons” (Canadian Journal of Philosophy, 2011). While at Princeton, she will be working on a book on metaethics, provisionally titled Mind the Gap: Ethics and the Problem of Attachment and Loss.

     



  9. Alec Walen

    Laurance S. Rockefeller Visiting Fellow

    Phone (609) 258-2660

    Fax (609) 258-2729

    Email awalen@princeton.edu

    Location 305 Marx Hall

    Alec Walen is a professor of law and philosophy at Rutgers University. He works mainly on the philosophy of rights and the intersection of moral philosophy and two aspects of law: criminal law and national security law. His publications include: "Transcending the Means Principle" (Law and Philosophy, forthcoming); "Agents, Impartiality, and the Priority of Claims over Duties" (Journal of Moral Philosophy, 2012); and "A Unified Theory of Detention" (Maryland Law Review, 2011). While at Princeton, he plans to finish a book, Detention in a Liberal State.

     



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